Help Protect Our Heroes                                              Operation Helmet Banner

Our Warriors Need Your Help

 

Please pause for a moment every day to honor those who have done so much for all of us
With your help, we've sent
76,158 helmet pad upgrade kits to our Warriors 'outside the wire' facing the enemy, risking their lives for YOU


Home

Troops are requesting helmet pad upgrade kits daily...the war is NOT over!

Please donate


Facebook link  Linkedin

Make a Donation

troop information

-request a kit
-feedback from troops
-helmet info
-- pads

-- burn testFire Testing
-armed forces
-- USMC
-- Army

-- Navy
-- USAF

- doc bob's blog
-Make a Donation
-get involved
-donors

-in memoriam
-feedback
-tell a friend
about operation helmet
-history
-about the org
-- advisory board
-- financials
-media information
-- press releases
-- news stories
-- audio
-- video
- Logos
-OpHelm stats
-photo gallery
-privacy
-FAQ
-other links
-soldiers for the truth
 

For the unvarnished info, see Doc Bob's BLOG

Soldier with helmet

Op Helmet


Website Ranking


Related:  Burn Testing  

Pads Information:

This is the seven-pad BLU6 kit (Oregon Aero) that we currently send. It fits both the Marine  LWH (shown here) and the Army-style ACH. Simply remove the old pad, replace the Velcro strips as necessary...clean interior kevlar shell with alcohol sponge first, let dry...put in the new pads and you're ready to go.

All foam pads will harden when exposed to extreme cold for prolonged periods. They will warm and soften to near-body-temperature a few minutes after being donned. The time to soften can be shortened by putting the helmet hear a heat source such as the heater vent in vehicle, stove, or other heat sources,  being careful not to scorch the pads/helmet. Heated pads tend to retain their warmth as well, so finding a good heat source can be important.

Team Wendy - two part foam pad covered with a thick non-porous plastic covering with external cloth covering.  One part of the foam is fairly pliable and the other is rather stiff.  The cloth covering is two colors: black and green or grey and green.  There may be markings on the pads such as ZAP or an NSN number. These pads are fairly stiff to the touch.

Oregon Aero - two part foam pad covered with a thin semi-permeable coating with a cloth cover. The cloth covering is two colors: black and green.  There is an Oregon Aero size tag on each pad.  These pads are very flexible to the touch.

MSA - one part foam pad with mesh layer covered with cloth cover.  The cloth covering is two colors: black and green or black and gray.  There may be markings on the pads such as an NSN number.  These pads are somewhat
flexible to the touch.

Skydex - two part pad covered with fabric.  The cloth covering is two colors: black and green.  There may be markings on the pads such as Skydex or an NSN number.  These pads are fairly stiff to the touch.

Interesting Test:  Take the trapezoidal or top round pad out of the helmet.  Lay it on a hard surface (parking lot, bar, floor, etc).  Punch with your fist (or your buddy's fist).  Start with a gentle punch.  If you can't hit as hard as you can, then you probably have a pad system that we didn't (or wouldn't) send you.  This test works best when you have pads from several different manufacturers to compare.

The pads below came out combat helmets with between six months
and two years of use.

The bottom pads was used for two 120-day tours.  The smell and color don't come thru
clearly in a photo.

 

 

Email ophelm@operation-helmet.org
with questions or comments
about Operation Helmet.
  2013 Operation Helmet
Last modified: 07/12/14